Florist News - Online Discussion Forum for Florists

Florist News

Online Discussion Forum for Florists

 

Elements and Principles of design?!?!!?

This is a discussion on Elements and Principles of design?!?!!? within the Floristry Training & Students forums, part of the Public Forums category; Hi all looking for a wee bit of help Have been set a new assingment - Identify elements and principles ...


Go Back   Florist News - Online Discussion Forum for Florists > Public Forums > Floristry Training & Students

Register FAQ Members List Calendar Mark Forums Read
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2008, 05:46 PM
happyhippy's Avatar
Junior Florist
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Herts
Posts: 31
happyhippy is an unknown quantity at this point
Elements and Principles of design?!?!!?

Hi all looking for a wee bit of help
Have been set a new assingment - Identify elements and principles of design - I can and have got to grips with most of the work ie the drawing in different materials etc but we have to write explaning about each element and finding it hard going finding information,diagrams and examples (supporting evidence?!?!?) about each one - form, texture, space and line (The colour one is ok as have just completed the colour wheel assingment)
Any help you guys could give me would be greaty appreciated xxxx
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2008, 06:08 PM
Apple's Avatar
Pie
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Orchard Grove
Posts: 5,341
Apple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really nice
omg its so long since ive been at college...jakey would be good at answering this one, not sure if hes on though, anyway, i'll give it a go lol.

would form be like spike, mass and transitional? (think thats right?) spike would be for making the outline of arrangements, mass is more of your focal flower and transitional , was that like spray carnations kind of like fillers? using different forms would give the design balance as in if the mass was on the outside then the arrangement would look a bit unbalanced? texture would be like shiney leafs as opposed to furry leaves and rough and smooth flowers omg, this is difficult , using different forms and textures gives the design interest. Space can be created by things like moss in an arrangement, modern designs benefit mostly from space i think using large leaves etc so everything doesnt looked crammed or too busy in the design. Line i think would like when you put your flowers in lines and groupings then that leads the eye through the arrangement? omg me heads about to burst, hope this helps?? Jaaaaaaaaaaaakkkkkkeeeeyyyyyyy
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2008, 06:43 PM
Leigh Bump's Avatar
Master Florist
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,897
Leigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really niceLeigh Bump is just really nice
Smile Tada!

This is taken from a booklet I have written for a flower club I demonstrate for. This is taken from the 'Arranging for Church' booklet I wrote. Please feel free to use the ideas, but not copy word-for-word! Some of it is over-simplified for them! Any problems, pm me!

It is important to understand what makes a pleasing floral design. Most designs that appeal follow the basic elements and principles.

The elements are:

Colour
Form
Space
Texture
Fig. 1. The Colour wheel



Colour can be used to great effect. Some colours recede (blue-green through to red-violet), and should be used in the centre of the arrangement to create depth.

Other colours are intense and advance (yellow-orange through to yellow-green) and should be used towards the edges of the design (See Fig. 1).

The colours of the cloths used during the Christian year are:

Advent and Lent - Violet
Christmas and Easter - White and Gold
Trinity Sunday and certain Saints Days - White
Holy Baptism and Marriages - White
Pentecost Week - Red

At other times of the year monochromatic (one colour in varying tints, tones, hues and shades) and triadic (three colours at equal distance on the colour wheel) colour schemes are very effective. Polychromatic (many colours) can look very messy unless executed with great skill.

Form relates to the shape of plant materials used and the shape of the overall design.

Using many plant material forms creates interest. Different forms include:

Line material – this is used as an outline for the design to help define the shape. Typical material includes Gladiolus, Eucalyptus, Laurel, Forsythia, Ruscus, Privet and Box.

Dominant material – this is used as a focal point, to draw the eye through the design. Bold clusters of showy blooms are most appropriate. Typical material includes Rose, Lily, Gerbera, Chrysanthemum bloom, Paeony, Hydrangea and Dahlia.

Filler material – This is used as a secondary material to hide mechanics and bare stems, create added interest, provide transition from the focal flowers and the outline material and reinforce the focal area. Typical material includes Alstroemeria, Aster, Gypsophila, Solidago, Chrysanthemum, Rosemary, Alchemilla Mollis and Holly.

The form (or shape) of the design can be many and varied.

*For a pedestal, formal, symmetrical front-facing is most appropriate. Pedestals can be all-round but this requires far more plant material. All-round would be a suitable design for the porch of the Mission Church.

Space is important to appreciate each part of a design. In traditional designs space is achieved through placing plant material at different levels, recessing deep into the design.

Texture relates specifically to the surface feel or appearance of the plant material. Surfaces can appear shiny (Laurel) or matt (Brachyglottis), spiky (Aloe) or Prickly (Holly) and so on.

A good mix of textures creates further interest.

The principles are:

Scale
Proportion
Balance
Rhythm
Dominance
Contrast
Harmony

Scale and Proportion are closely linked.

Scale relates to the size relationship. This can be the relationship between: plant material used; between the arrangement and the venue; and the arrangement in relation to the container.

Proportion relates to dimensions, measurement and quantities. The Romans developed the ‘golden proportion’ which is 1/3 to 2/3. This always looks pleasing. This means using a proportion of 1/3 container and 2/3 arrangement.

* For a traditional church arrangement ensure some large, showy blooms are chosen that will show up from afar.

* A church arrangement should be much larger than you would design for your home. Make sure you step back from time-to-time to check shape, size, proportion and scale.

Fig. 2. Correct Proportions

*Two large scale arrangements prominently placed are more visually effective than filling every nook and cranny in the church!

*For a traditional church arrangement the design should be 1 ½ times larger than the container (See Fig. 2). Don’t panic though, if your pedestal is 1.5 metres, it does not mean you have to reach for the step ladder! The design could cascade with 1/3 above the container and 2/3 below.

Balance is an important aspect of design. There are two types of balance; actual and visual.

Actual balance refers the design being stable and secure. This is achieved through using a solid base and ensuring plant material is securely anchored in place. There is nothing more embarrassing than an arrangement toppling over mid-ceremony!

Visual balance is achieved through ensuring materials are arranged around an imaginary vertical or horizontal axis. The eye should be drawn equally to both halves of a design, even if it is asymmetric. Dark flowers look ‘heavier’ than pale ones, round flowers look ‘heavier’ than trumpet-shaped ones. Large flowers placed centrally and near the bottom give a sense of balance

*For a traditional arrangement the design should have a central focal line with even distribution of flower on either side. This will help maintain actual and visual balance.

Rhythm is generated by the eye travelling from one area of interest, in the design, to another. This is created by using lines, repetition and grouping of material.

*For a tradition arrangement lines running through the central focal line help create rhythm.

Dominance is created when using a single colour, flower, shape, line or texture has a controlling influence over the entire design. Traditionally there is one central focal line, which leads to a focal flower. From the focal flower, or point, all stems should appear to radiate, reinforcing the dominance.

Effective use of recession will also aid dominance. This is created by placing flowers deep into the design, which draw the eye in.

Contrast is to set opposite colours, sizes, textures and forms to highlight their differences. Again, this creates interest.

Harmony can be described as the culmination of all the elements and principles to produce a pleasing design appropriate to the venue: All working as one.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2008, 06:56 PM
Apple's Avatar
Pie
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Orchard Grove
Posts: 5,341
Apple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really niceApple is just really nice
told you jakey would know this one
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 16-11-2008, 11:15 PM
Polly Ribbon's Avatar
Funny florist
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: in Johnny's arms... *sigh*
Posts: 6,065
Polly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nicePolly Ribbon is just really nice
Jakeypedia strikes again!
__________________
Tina

Life's too short and so am I
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 17-11-2008, 11:49 PM
Florist
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 139
hells is on a distinguished road
Red face

When I did something along these lines I related the rhythm within a design to the rhythm in music, a pattern suggesting movement or space, I looked up definitions in the dictionary and it worked really well.
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 18-11-2008, 10:03 PM
jackie's Avatar
Junior Florist
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: liverpool merseyside
Posts: 20
jackie is an unknown quantity at this point
Principles and elements of design

Hi try this site its got lots of great bits on that will help you




WISE: Web Index/Search Environment



Jackie
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2010, 05:20 PM
Experienced Florist
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 215
emma.j is an unknown quantity at this point
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakenl2001 View Post
This is taken from a booklet I have written for a flower club I demonstrate for. This is taken from the 'Arranging for Church' booklet I wrote. Please feel free to use the ideas, but not copy word-for-word! Some of it is over-simplified for them! Any problems, pm me!

It is important to understand what makes a pleasing floral design. Most designs that appeal follow the basic elements and principles.

The elements are:

Colour
Form
Space
Texture
Fig. 1. The Colour wheel



Colour can be used to great effect. Some colours recede (blue-green through to red-violet), and should be used in the centre of the arrangement to create depth.

Other colours are intense and advance (yellow-orange through to yellow-green) and should be used towards the edges of the design (See Fig. 1).

The colours of the cloths used during the Christian year are:

Advent and Lent - Violet
Christmas and Easter - White and Gold
Trinity Sunday and certain Saints Days - White
Holy Baptism and Marriages - White
Pentecost Week - Red

At other times of the year monochromatic (one colour in varying tints, tones, hues and shades) and triadic (three colours at equal distance on the colour wheel) colour schemes are very effective. Polychromatic (many colours) can look very messy unless executed with great skill.

Form relates to the shape of plant materials used and the shape of the overall design.

Using many plant material forms creates interest. Different forms include:

Line material – this is used as an outline for the design to help define the shape. Typical material includes Gladiolus, Eucalyptus, Laurel, Forsythia, Ruscus, Privet and Box.

Dominant material – this is used as a focal point, to draw the eye through the design. Bold clusters of showy blooms are most appropriate. Typical material includes Rose, Lily, Gerbera, Chrysanthemum bloom, Paeony, Hydrangea and Dahlia.

Filler material – This is used as a secondary material to hide mechanics and bare stems, create added interest, provide transition from the focal flowers and the outline material and reinforce the focal area. Typical material includes Alstroemeria, Aster, Gypsophila, Solidago, Chrysanthemum, Rosemary, Alchemilla Mollis and Holly.

The form (or shape) of the design can be many and varied.

*For a pedestal, formal, symmetrical front-facing is most appropriate. Pedestals can be all-round but this requires far more plant material. All-round would be a suitable design for the porch of the Mission Church.

Space is important to appreciate each part of a design. In traditional designs space is achieved through placing plant material at different levels, recessing deep into the design.

Texture relates specifically to the surface feel or appearance of the plant material. Surfaces can appear shiny (Laurel) or matt (Brachyglottis), spiky (Aloe) or Prickly (Holly) and so on.

A good mix of textures creates further interest.

The principles are:

Scale
Proportion
Balance
Rhythm
Dominance
Contrast
Harmony

Scale and Proportion are closely linked.

Scale relates to the size relationship. This can be the relationship between: plant material used; between the arrangement and the venue; and the arrangement in relation to the container.

Proportion relates to dimensions, measurement and quantities. The Romans developed the ‘golden proportion’ which is 1/3 to 2/3. This always looks pleasing. This means using a proportion of 1/3 container and 2/3 arrangement.

* For a traditional church arrangement ensure some large, showy blooms are chosen that will show up from afar.

* A church arrangement should be much larger than you would design for your home. Make sure you step back from time-to-time to check shape, size, proportion and scale.

Fig. 2. Correct Proportions

*Two large scale arrangements prominently placed are more visually effective than filling every nook and cranny in the church!

*For a traditional church arrangement the design should be 1 ½ times larger than the container (See Fig. 2). Don’t panic though, if your pedestal is 1.5 metres, it does not mean you have to reach for the step ladder! The design could cascade with 1/3 above the container and 2/3 below.

Balance is an important aspect of design. There are two types of balance; actual and visual.

Actual balance refers the design being stable and secure. This is achieved through using a solid base and ensuring plant material is securely anchored in place. There is nothing more embarrassing than an arrangement toppling over mid-ceremony!

Visual balance is achieved through ensuring materials are arranged around an imaginary vertical or horizontal axis. The eye should be drawn equally to both halves of a design, even if it is asymmetric. Dark flowers look ‘heavier’ than pale ones, round flowers look ‘heavier’ than trumpet-shaped ones. Large flowers placed centrally and near the bottom give a sense of balance

*For a traditional arrangement the design should have a central focal line with even distribution of flower on either side. This will help maintain actual and visual balance.

Rhythm is generated by the eye travelling from one area of interest, in the design, to another. This is created by using lines, repetition and grouping of material.

*For a tradition arrangement lines running through the central focal line help create rhythm.

Dominance is created when using a single colour, flower, shape, line or texture has a controlling influence over the entire design. Traditionally there is one central focal line, which leads to a focal flower. From the focal flower, or point, all stems should appear to radiate, reinforcing the dominance.

Effective use of recession will also aid dominance. This is created by placing flowers deep into the design, which draw the eye in.

Contrast is to set opposite colours, sizes, textures and forms to highlight their differences. Again, this creates interest.

Harmony can be described as the culmination of all the elements and principles to produce a pleasing design appropriate to the venue: All working as one.
Thank you Jake for this reference material great help x
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 17-01-2010, 09:00 PM
Sazzle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: stockport
Posts: 7,582
Sazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really niceSazzle is just really nice
haven't you all got society of floristry handbooks? it's all in there, if you haven't they are about £3.50 and worth every penny
__________________
Playing with flowers
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


All times are GMT. The time now is 02:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®

SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.